Category : Healthy Life

Home»Archive by Category" Healthy Life"

Tips for Aging in Place

What Every Senior Should Know About Safely Aging In Place

Kent Elliott

Nearly 90 percent of seniors in the U.S. want to age in place (stay in their homes), even if they may eventually need daily assistance or in-home health care. While it’s understandable why one would want to maintain their independence in their own surroundings, their home may not be adapted to mobility and health issues, so it’s important that modifications are made to ensure one’s safety and comfort. Of course, the best time to make such changes is before they are actually needed to prevent injury from occurring — some people start as early as their fifties or sixties.

While you can conduct your own home assessment in order to determine your needs, it’s best to hire an occupational therapist (sometimes paid for by Medicare) to do the job for you, as they’re trained to make such judgments, even prematurely. These pros also have extensive knowledge of assistive technologies, which is helpful because there is an abundance of new options and advancements on the market on a regular basis.

Once you figure out which modifications you need, decide which ones you can do yourself, which require the help of a pro, and how you’re going to pay for everything. Here’s a guide to help you navigate this process so that you can stay safe while saving as much money as possible.

DIY

There are many simple tweaks you can do on your own that take little time or effort, starting with removing all tripping hazards, such as area rugs and excessive clutter. Other considerations include:

  • Swapping out grungy carpets for a low-density, shorter pile variety and installing slip-resistant flooring in the bathroom and kitchen.
  • For those struggling with visibility (including those with dementia), task lighting can make it easier to perform everyday activities, such as brushing teeth, reading, and cooking. Painting the walls in a light but glare-free color while keeping the ceiling white can improve the lighting in a room, too.
  • Replace regular faucets with modified anti-scald valves that rely on water pressure to regulate the flow of hot water.
  • Handrails on both sides of all staircases and grab bars in the bathroom near the toilet and in the shower/tub are essential aids for preventing falls.
  • Assistive technology such as a video doorbell that’s connected to Wi-Fi provides both safety and convenience, while a personal medical alert system offers peace of mind to seniors and loved ones alike.

Hire A Pro

Before hiring a pro, make sure you obtain references — particularly from clients who also needed similar home modifications. While it is possible to build a wheelchair ramp yourself, it’s a complex and time-consuming project, so you’re better off leaving it in the hands of an expert, especially since safety is a concern. Other big-ticket projects that require assistance are installing a chair stair lift or elevator, replacing a tub with a walk-in shower, and lowering countertops and cabinets for easier use.

Funding The Modifications

Not all modifications come cheaply, but there are grants available to those in need. Though not available everywhere in the U.S., there are some state assistance programs to help fund age-related construction and home enhancements.

If home modifications aren’t enough to make a completely safe environment, consider searching for an accessible property in your area. Make a checklist to find what you’re looking for, and use an online filter to help you narrow down your options. Note that homes in Seattle, Washington, typically sell for $737,000.

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Learn more about Kent

My Book

Trainer Spotlight: Tim Beauchamp

Trainer Spotlight: Tim Beauchamp

You teach a regular morning class, “Strength Training 101”, at FHC. It is geared for members that are 50+ years of age. Why is this target group such a passion for you?

It’s funny, it did not start out being a primary interest, but I was offered the chance to take over a class that Swedish Hospital had been running for post-cardiac rehab patients at my old gym, Sound Mind and Body. After watching what they were doing, I went and talked to the members of the class and said that I would take over the class, but would change things up because I did not think that they were doing enough. The class became “Silver Power” (the students picked the name, not me). That was almost 15 years ago. As I have trained more and more, I realize that there is a huge need for older people to do more for their basic health. Aging is so popular, that everybody is doing it, but not that many are doing it as well as they could. I have worked hard to stay fit as I get older and have learned a lot that I think is useful for others. I have also learned a lot from the older clients that I have trained, have seen the difference that physical training can have on people’s lives first hand.

What is your background? What drew you to training and teaching?

I have been an athlete all of my life, starting to play tennis when I was six and becoming a serious cyclist and swimmer in high school. I played tennis in college and was first exposed to judo there as well. Once I moved to Germany as a new lieutenant in the Army, I joined the local judo team and worked my way onto the highest level competitions in Germany. After some serious surgery on both of my legs, I got back into cycling and swimming to rehabilitate myself. Because I was already in the Army and had been a runner, I soon decided to try running a triathlon. I competed internationally for several years in Europe and continued to train to this day. Back in the States, I was in a military reserve unit as a major and was approached by the brigade commander to help set up a remedial Physical Training program for the unit. After being struck by a car while on a training ride, I again rehabilitated myself. Friends suggested that I knew so much about training and rehab that I should make a career of it.

I also hear that you are a do-it-yourself carpenter, a musician, and a writer. Did I miss anything?

I am getting back into my photography and scuba diving, and hoping to get my planted aquariums back up and running!

Member Spotlight: Peter Brickman

If you haven’t met Peter Brickman during your workout, he is one of our long-time members and comes in almost daily for his workout. He’s newly retired but is as active as ever. One of the friendliest guys you will meet, Peter loves bicycling, dogs and tennis, and staying active.

Peter, you are a very active senior. What keeps you going so strong?
Some years ago, when I thought I was old, I referred to the joke: “If I knew I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself.” Now that I really am old, it’s not that funny. I’m an insulin dependent diabetic, so diet, exercise, and reduced stress are things that I am constantly aware of; of course, this is important for everyone! Exercise has always been part of my life- it’s become a good addiction!

Besides coming to the gym almost every day, what other activities do you do?
I ride my bike everywhere! My tennis game has suffered, due to some physical restrictions. But, I’m still enthusiastic and every once in a while I hit a good shot that brings me back. Now that I’m recently retired, I’m catching up on my books and DVD’s and plan on taking continuing education classes. I have worked as a professional chef and I have more time to test my cooking skills and surprise myself.

How has the Fremont Health Club made a difference in your life?
The family atmosphere is comforting and inviting. The new sauna will seal the deal forever.

My dog, Harley, jumps up as soon you enter the building because he knows you so well. Are you a dog whisperer?
I try to say “Woof!” to every dog I meet, to let them know I’m a member of the pack. Harley is my BFF.

Any advice you want to pass along to others?
Good health is everything.

 

Instructor Spotlight: Katelyn Page

We are thrilled to have Katelyn Page back with us,  teaching Barre and Yoga. We asked her a few questions about her motivations as a teacher, her teaching style, and the importance of community.

FHC: You teach different types of classes, such as Barre and Yoga. What are the benefits of practicing a variation of classes?

KP: I love Yoga and I love Barre and they each give different challenges physically and mentally, and I think that’s important.  A well-rounded approach works best in the fitness world. Each class has a different intention. With Barre, there’s a big emphasis on muscle endurance. With yoga, there’s more emphasis on stretching and growing flexibility. It’s important to find different ways to gain muscle strength, cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, muscular endurance, and of course intentional nutrition. When the goal is optimal results, it’s important to find the well rounded cross-training experience.

FHC: How did you start teaching yoga?
KP: I fell in love with yoga when I was young. My mom has scoliosis and so we would do some yoga together in our living room. I was drawn to how powerful I felt breathing with intention, and to how strong I felt holding postures. Armed with this appreciation, my relationship with yoga grew the more I practiced. Once I decided to take the leap and take teacher training, I haven’t really looked back since.

FHC: What inspires you most about teaching?

KP: My students. Seeing their progress each week inspires me to be better. There’s such an incredible feeling when a student gets crow pose after weeks of practicing. Or seeing a student nail a V-Sit Ball Exchange. Experiencing that communion together feels spiritual. A lot of my students have become my closet friends, and it’s just because we both show up each week. I am genuinely honored to be teaching and it’s been so humbling to meet so many amazing individuals.

FHC: Why do you emphasize community in your classes?

KP: I have never tried to incorporate community, inclusion has always come naturally for me. Many students come to the same classes each week, and we see the same faces each time. We experience a class together, and if you’ve taken my classes then you know it’s a challenge, and we are all struggling together. To me, it feels natural to show encouragement to each other, or interact and acknowledge that we are all experiencing something together. At the beginning of each Barre class, I have my students introduce themselves to their neighbors and instantly the mood in the classroom shifts from a very intense and solemn vibe to a more playful, friendly, and inclusive experience. It’s hard to make friends as an adult, and I understand that for many, life is really freaking hard, and sometimes lonely. Taking the time to create a sense of community, to know that we’re not alone, it’s important.

FHC: For those that haven’t taken your classes yet, what do you want them to know?

KP: In my classes, you can expect a playful and challenging class, where you can come as you are. I try to let loose, have fun, and will probably dance during class. Oh, and I play fun music that you’ll want to dance to too. Life is way too short not to celebrate! I want my students, new and old, to know that I think they are important, that they matter a great deal, and that showing up is enough. My only expectation for you is to be kind. To those around you, but also to yourself.

Instructor Spotlight: Meet Janell Hartman

Janell Hartman, true to her name, has a big heart. She has been teaching Vinyasa Yoga at FHC since we first started six years ago.  In the early years, she volunteered with us, while we got established.  Her knowledge, experience, and love for the art of yoga have been a life-changing for many. Besides her involvement with the FHC, she is spreading her love and knowledge of yoga to critical programs like Yoga Behind Bars and offers Teacher Trainings in the Seattle area. Basically, Janelle is a rock star and we wanted to share a few things about her with you all.

What drew you to volunteer to teach with Yoga Behind Bars?

Early 2013 I happened to answer a call for help one evening at a friend’s restaurant when one of their servers was sick. They were hosting a fundraiser for Yoga Behind Bars and one of the guest speakers was a former inmate who had been released from prison a couple of years prior. She shared how the yoga classes and teachers had impacted her life inside and helped her integrate when she got out. I was moved to tears. That was it for me. I got involved right away.

What inspires you the most about teaching in prison?

There are very few folks who ever get to know themselves as well as those who’ve been to very dark places, have been ostracized, and experienced profoundly deep conflict. When that degree of darkness is navigated and transformed, the light of that redemption can guide a suffering world into balance. I witness the power of ethics and soul development at the core of the ancient Yogic teachings changing these guys in a big way. They’re forging true freedom independent of their circumstances. They’re turning around and sharing it. That inspires me.

What else are you up to?

I conduct teacher trainings for Yin and for Restorative yoga a few times per year here in Seattle and out at Breitenbush Hotsprings. My main work is at the Tummy Temple, a wonderful naturopathic healing center where I am a colon hydrotherapist and electro-lymphatic therapist. I’m also their director of outreach and education. I teach a free community class on a different practical natural health topic every first Thursday of the month at Tummy Temple. Hop on our website and check out our services and happenings!

How to get the most out of classes at FHC

In this post, one of our wonderful trainers, Allison Axdorff, shares a few thoughts on the value of group fitness:

Did you know FHC offers over 45 classes each week? If you haven’t tried them yet, you may not be getting the most out of your membership.

You may consider me little biased. I’m a long-time group fitness fanatic and instructor of POUND, a full body workout inspired by the energizing and sweat-dripping fun of playing the drums. But, there are reasons I am this passionate about group fitness. Read on to learn why and how to get the most out of classes here at FHC.

Show up

When you sign up for a class you are penciling in time that you’ve made for yourself and that self-care is a wonderful thing. We all know that life happens, but committing in advance keeps you accountable for the time you’ve set aside. Let us be your “accountabilibuddy”. Even if you show up holding on to your stress and worries, you’ll leave feeling more positive and ready to tackle whatever is next.

Mix it up

It’s important to change up your workouts to avoid muscle stagnation, prevent injury, and keep your mind focused and engaged. The instructors at FHC bring new moves and routines to class to ensure it stays fresh. You can also mix it up by trying new classes. During prime time at FHC there is often more than one class on the schedule, which allows you to mix it up while keeping a routine.

Trying a new class takes (or anything new) takes courage. Even as an instructor, I find that I can be nervous or feel awkward trying a new class or format for the first time. I remind myself that everyone either is or has been in the same position. At the end of class, I’m always happy that I tried something new. Sometimes when you’re new to a class format your brain may be doing as much flexing as your muscles. I encourage my students to try a class two or three times to get a true feel for it.

There are also smaller ways to mix it up with the classes you may already be attending. We are creatures of habit, even when it comes to “our spot” in the room. Try taking the class from another location in the studio and see how it changes the experience. Maybe with the new angle, you’ll notice something different about form or at the very least make a new friend.

Connect

I’m a strong believer that group fitness is about so much more than the workout. One thing I love about FHC is the small class sizes. Over the past year that I’ve been teaching at FHC, I’ve been blown away by how kind, passionate, and fun FHC members are. Make sure to say hello and meet someone new in your next class!

Make it your own

In group fitness, while we are working out together, we shouldn’t all be working out the same.

Another benefit of the small class sizes at FHC is that your instructors are there to help customize the class so you get the most out of the workout. Whether you’re looking to take the intensity to the next level or find the right modification, it can be accomplished. Ask your instructor before or after class how a workout can be customized for what you need. Lastly, your feedback about any part of the workout is always welcome (seriously, if you’re not digging the new Iggy Azalea lunge track let me know). This is your workout too and together we make the best spot in Fremont to get fit.

I encourage you to keep these in mind as you make the most of the classes offered at FHC. And if you come to my class, all I ask is that you make the workout what you need (with help from me of course) and HAVE FUN. In the POUND Rockout Workout, you can’t make mistakes, you can only have drum solos.

See you at FHC,

Allison Axdorff

Meet Kristin Varner – an incredible illustrator and a loyal FHC fitness enthusiast

 

We were so impressed by Kristin’s work, we wanted to share it with you. Check out the Q&A below to learn a bit more.

 

Q: Tell me about your published work.

A: I’ve been working as a freelance illustrator for about 18 years. My first published work out of college was mainly editorial illustrations for magazines, newspapers, and brochures. Over the course of my career, I’ve created art for television commercials, educational books, toys apparel and other products. However, the last few years I have been fortunate enough to focus on my true passion which is children’s book work. I have one picture book published titled, PINK CUPCAKE MAGIC, written by Katherine Tegen and published by Henry Holt and Co. I am currently working on another picture book (writing and illustrating) as well as a graphic novel that I hope to be sending out to publishers soon.

Q: What got you started in this field and what are your goals?

A: I’ve been drawing since childhood and by high school, I began to take it more seriously. I attended art school at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) and graduated with a BFA in Illustration. I was never exactly sure what area of Illustration I wanted to specialize in, but the whimsical nature of my work lent itself to the children’s market. I have always loved and collected children’s books, so naturally, to create them has been a lifelong dream of mine.

Q: Have you hit any obstacles, and if so, how did you get through them?

A: How to survive financially has been the hardest obstacle I’ve faced living the life of a freelance illustrator. Concentration in the children’s book industry has been particularly tough due to the market being so over-saturated with the many talented illustrators out there. It’s been a rough go at times and I’ve had to take less desirable jobs to make ends meet, but keeping goals in sight and never giving up when I’ve been tempted to throw in the towel have kept me going. Also relying on my people skills has helped me tremendously, as I’ve been fortunate to forge many good relationships with clients that have continued over the years.

Q: Tell us some more about yourself and your family.

A: I grew up in the Rocky Mountains of Salt Lake City, Utah and still find my happy place, skiing or snowboarding in the mountains here in the Pacific Northwest. I lived for several years in Brooklyn, New York, where I met my husband. We moved to Berlin, Germany where our daughter, Francis was born. We were pulled back to the States by the mighty Amazon giant, and have been here in Seattle for the past five years, and happy to call Fremont our home. I love traveling, enjoying time with friends and family, riding bikes, and I’m also a bit of a history nerd.   

Q: How has FHC been part of your life and for how long?

A: Several years ago, I was a member at one of the large, club gyms in town which I had joined for the child care option. However, my daughter, Francis,  who was nearly 2 years old at the time, absolutely loathed this gym and would cry incessantly until one of the employees would come fetch me. I was rarely able to get a full workout in. My husband discovered and joined FHC first, and after meeting Lillian he thought that Francis would be much happier with a smaller setting and Lillian looking after her. I decided to give it a shot and quit the other gym. Francis was comfortable with Lillian right away.  That was nearly 4 years ago, and I’ve been coming to FHC ever since and Francis still does too. In fact, I have to be secretive about going when it’s just myself on days when Francis is at school. She loves the gym and always wants to go see Lillian.

Q: How do you stay motivated to keep fit and maintain a healthy lifestyle?

A: I try to stay in tune with what is going on with my body, and I’ve always been the type of person that gets very cranky if I’ve been working too much or haven’t been to the gym or gone on a run for a few days. Keeping it all in balance makes sense when it comes to diet, exercise and everything else. I cook more often than not so I can monitor more closely what our family is eating  (even though dining out in Seattle is such a treat). I like getting hooked on routines and the noontime classes at the gym have been a game changer for me. I really look forward to those days and the anticipation of not knowing what the instructor will be throwing at us. I also look forward to gym sessions on my own where I finally have time to put on my headphones and listen to podcasts that I like to follow.  I even find that some of my best inspiration for work comes when I’m out on a run or sweating it out.

follow Kristin at: Instagram // Facebook // Twitter

Friend focus

We notice both of you here a lot. Outside of proximity, is there any reason why you’ve chosen FHC to train?

 

MEG: We love the feeling of community at the gym. I especially love the fact that people bring their kids and dogs to the gym as they work out, and that FHC is not just open to that but welcomes families, including companion animals. We also appreciate the diversity of the trainers (gender, racial), the variety of classes, and philosophies of health and fitness, as well as the range of ages and personalities so evident on the gym floor and in classes.

 

TL : From the beginning, we have liked the relaxed and friendly vibe at FHC. It is not a “grunt and groan” kind of place, but a welcoming space that has all kinds of people coming in, from your serious athletes to your middle-aged college professors. It is also nice that the team of trainers are not only really good at what they do, but clearly get along with each other and create a sense of community among them and us mere mortals. The diversity of the trainers and staff (including folks who are from various Indigenous, racial and ethnic groups, and includes women and men) is an important part of what make FHC special.

 

How does your exercise or training help you with your careers?

 

MEG: About one year after I had my son, I took on the directorship of an interdisciplinary program at the University of Washington. I had not anticipated the amount of administrative work this entailed, on top of my teaching, research, taking care of my son, and keeping things under control at home. Managing stress became (and continues to be) a high priority, and I quickly realized that working out helped me greatly. But it was not until I started taking Rebecca’s kickboxing classes, and then training with her, that I was really able to start breathing again. Working out, and especially taking cardio and strength classes with Kris Walters and Rebecca, helps me stay focused and better able to juggle work, home, and life.

 

TL: There is no question that I think better with exercise. Not only does it clear the cobwebs, but it also helps give me a place to work some stress out and also just feel better. I don’t go to the gym as much as ME does (she is hard to keep up with!), but regular work outs usually mean that I am happier and more productive.

 

Tony-you train with Manny a lot. Hearing you two work and have fun is one of my favorite things about working here. Why do you choose to train with him as opposed to some other method?

 

What can I say about Manny Dunham? He is an amazing teacher (says the middle-aged college professor)!

 

I have always been interested in boxing and followed it as a fan, but never had the chance to actually learn the finer, technical parts of the sport. Working with Manny has been fantastic. The guy is obviously incredibly talented, but he is also very smart and funny. Manny pushes me hard physically, way harder than I could push myself, but he has also helped me see just how much boxers need to use their brains. There is much about boxing that is counter-intuitive and thus takes some re-wiring upstairs in the head. Getting a combination right entails not only the order of the punches, but also an awareness of your body, a sweaty understanding of physics, and also an ability to laugh (as Manny will be making jokes during most of the session, especially when you are doing ab work, because that is when laughing hurts the most. The man is devious).

Working with Manny is fantastic. It has been the best part of working out at FHC.

 

MariaElena, You’re one of our most consistent students in class. You also take a variety of classes. What’s your philosophy about variety.

Until taking Rebecca’s kickboxing class almost 2 years ago, I much preferred working out on my own. But taking that class, I noticed that I pushed myself harder; I learned new things, and I felt accountable to the instructor and my fellow students. That motivated me, and with Rebecca’s encouragement, I began to branch out and try out different classes. Given the wonderful range of classes available at FHC, I now try to attend a variety of classes each week, combining cardio, strength, core, and stretching/lengthening. Attending such a mix of classes, and working with different instructors, has helped me think more holistically about my fitness, as well as allowing me the opportunity to learn new exercises in a challenging but supportive environment. I am also able to apply this to my own workouts, incorporating new techniques that help me push myself continuously.

 

Outside of FHC, where do you spend your free time?

 

MEG: There is such little free time! But we try to take family vacations whenever possible (San Diego is our son’s favorite destination), and spend time with friends. I love cooking and eating, so we try to have friends over regularly to share food, drink, and laughter. We also love going out to the many amazing restaurants this city has to offer, and taking Toñito to various museums, Seattle Children’s Theater and the Seattle Symphony. Now that the weather is getting nicer, we will spend many afternoons and weekends with our son in parks or out in our backyard.

 

TL: What is this “free time” you talk about? Actually, our little man has given us back the weekend, since he calls the shots when he is not in school. So on Saturday and Sunday, we are at some of the amazing museums in town (Burke, Mo Pop, Pacific Science Center, SAM and especially the Olympic Sculpture Park. Our son has also just gotten old enough to enjoy the movie theater, so we have seen every children’s movie that has come out in the last year. Power Rangers, I have to admit, was kind of awesome.

 

Is it important that you instill in your son your own dedication to fitness, or do you lead by example.

 

MEG: We try to live an active life, so we do make it a point to go out for walks or play in the park with our son as much as we can. We also find it important for him to see us taking the time to go to the gym or go for a run. For him, exercising is simply part of what we do each day, and something we clearly enjoy. This last part is important; whatever he does, we want him to have fun. One of his favorite things is to pick me up from a class at the gym, and to punch the heavy bag with Tony as they wait for me to finish.

 

TL: One of the advice parents get is that play is a kid’s job right now. For most kids, and Toñito for sure, play means running, jumping and pouncing. We definitely try to encourage him to do that a lot and especially be outside, but the truth is that we are just letting our kid be a kid. Chasing him around actually keeps us in shape!

6 Survival Strategies for Fitness Success

 

6 Survival Strategies for Fitness Success

Brought to you by Devon Johnson-Porter

Slow and Steady Wins the Race

Losing 1-2 pounds of body fat a week ensures healthy and consistent weight loss. An overwhelming task if your goal is to lose 20 pounds for a Caribbean cruise set for next year. With a long term goal set it is as important to establish several measurable, short-term benchmarks as well. An example of a healthy short term goal could be a 6 -10 pound fat loss set for six weeks and rewarded with a pedicure or massage. By setting and rewarding short term goals as well as long term goals, you encourage long term focus and inspire and motivate long term success.

 

Does it Measure up?

We’ve all, at one time been frustrated by the down a pound yesterday, up two pounds today, reading of a weight measured scale. With daily exercise and good nutrition, how is this possible?

Rest assured you are not going insane. It is possible to lose inches and not pounds because muscle is heavier by volume than fat. It is more important to pay attention to body composition and not body weight. Using a tape measure you can record the circumference of different areas of the body. Suggested areas to measure are the neck, chest, arms, waist, hips and thighs.

Your body mass index is also important because if too high, you’re at an increased risk of many chronic health issues such as; high blood pressure; type-two diabetes and heart disease. Your actual BMI can be found through a simple formula of your height in inches x 2.54 divided by 100 then squared (multiply # by itself). Take the weight in pounds and divide by 2.2. The weight (determined above) divided by height (determined above).

Knowing and understanding your current body’s measurements and your body mass index allows you to see at an instant when you are losing body fat, gaining lean muscle mass and maintaining our body’s health and well being.

 

You Are What You Think

The power of positive thinking is a concept that many of us are familiar with. By exchanging a negative thought for a positive one we manifest a life in which we attract our heart’s desire. In fact, positive affirmations and positive thinking develop powerful and positive attitudes in life which are essential in life success, and good health. What ever thoughts you hold in your mind persistently will eventually appear in your physical world.

If your thoughts are that you are fat, ugly and undeserving, those negative thoughts will inevitably attract those same situations into your life. Instead focus only on the traits that you like about yourself. This change in thought will provide an environment that will attract more of what you physically want and desire from yourself. In short; unhealthy thoughts create an unhealthy body.

 

Brown Bag It

Due to busy and hectic lifestyles, over twenty five percent of Americans depend on the convenience of fast food daily. Unfortunately, convenience comes with a steep price of obesity and heart disease. Often, someone can consume all the calories they need for an entire day in one sitting at a fast food restaurant. If you do not have a meal plan you are likely to grab anything when hunger strikes and that will keep you from reaching and maintaining your health and weight loss goals.

Start by planning an entire day’s worth of eating the evening before. Consider all meals such as breakfast, lunch and dinner as well as a few snacks which will stave off hunger and maintain our body’s energy and metabolism. By planning your meals you will ensure that you are receiving a sensible and balanced diet; reduce the temptation and convenience of fast food; and achieve your health and weight loss goals.

 

The Biggest Bang for Your Buck

Choosing exercises that give you the most stimulation in the minimum amount of time is the ultimate fitness trainer secret. You can burn an additional 25% more calories by lifting weights. Weight training gives you a metabolic spike for an hour after a workout because your body is trying hard to help your muscles recover. The efficacy of a weight lifting exercise depends on the exercises ability to involve the maximum amount of muscle fibers and its ability to provide neuromuscular stimulation. Below are exercises that are guaranteed to provide the biggest impact in the shortest amount of time.

Squat Dead lift

1.Stand with your feet hip distance apart with your toes, knees and hips are in a straight line. 2. Pull your belly button towards your spine and contract your abdominal muscles. 3. Slowly lower your body as though you are sitting in a chair. 4. If you can, go down until your butt is in line with your knees (90 degrees). 5. Make sure your knees are behind your toes. 6. Keep the weight in your heels slowly push your body back to starting position. 7. Keep legs straight and maintain a flat back. 8. Bend forward from the hips until your back is parallel to the ground. 9. As you bend forward your hips and gluteus should be centered through your heels. 10. At the bottom of the movement raise your torso back into an erect starting position. 4 sets of 12-20.

 

 Lateral Plank Pushup

 

1.Assume a prone position on the floor 2. Position hands palms down on the floor, approximately shoulder width apart, curl your toes upward so that the balls of your feet touch the ground 3. Raise yourself using your arms, making a straight line from your head to your heels 4. Lower your torso to the ground until your elbows form a 90 degree angle 5. Raise yourself by attempting to push the ground away from you 6. Shift one hand to the center and lift the other balancing all the weight on one hand. Turn the shoulders to be perpendicular to the floor. The body should now be a straight diagonal from the feet up through the head 7. Return to starting position and repeat on the other arm. 4 sets of 12-20.

 

Bosu Bent Low Row

1.With resistance bar in hand, standing with both feet on the bosu ball. Palms facing forward and knees slightly bent, bend at waist with your back flat 2. Bring  bent elbows up past back squeezing shoulder blades together.

 

Stability Ball Prone Iso Abs

 

1.Face down, put your forearms under your chest and clasp your hands together 2. Place your forearms on the top of a stability ball and position your feet a fist- width apart 3. Curl your toes under you and push up onto your forearms. Your back should be straight and your abdominal muscles engaged. Hold the position for 60 seconds.

 

Cardiovascular interval training will also add an additional boost to your fitness and weight loss goals. An example of aerobic interval training could be fast – paced running for three minutes then two minutes of fast- paced walking. Continue for the duration of 30- 40 minutes.

 

Exercises that increase aerobic capacity and involve the maximum amount of muscle fibers will boost the amount of calories burned; lean muscle mass built; and strength gained ultimately shortening the optimal health and fitness achievement timeline.

 

For more from Devon, contact her via her Perfect Balance email Devonjohnson3@yahoo.com

Katelyn Page

Since I’ve been here at Fremont, the compliments and comments Katelyn Page has received have been plentiful. “She’s so creative” “She’s is so inclusive” are among some of the things I’ve heard. We finally have a moment and are able to get some comments from Katelyn herself. So, without much more ado, a few words from Katelyn:

Why/when/where did you decide that this was your passion? Because the time/risk it takes to educate yourself, become certified, build up a client base, etc. is rough, it must come from the heart right? Tell us your story!
I started yoga young with my mom whenever her back started hurting. I began feeling awareness of my body and my breath, and I felt empowered. I found my love for yoga then but I never took my practice seriously until I began my certification. I always thought teaching yoga would be a really fun job but it didn’t seem financially plausible. After I lost some close to me a few years ago, it shifted my perspective and I felt how short life really is. I decided to pursue my 200 hour certification but I didn’t have the two thousand dollar tuition. I reached out to my friends and everyone gave $10 or so. A few weeks later I was fully financially supported and signed up for certification! I have been learning ever since and love when my students ask questions and we get to learn together. I’ve found something that I not only love doing but I get to share with others. 
Have a crazy plank idea? Or a circuit that really kills?
One legged triceps push-ups are killerrr. Alternate sides with a tricep push-up in between. Add in a few wide arm push-ups and you have a killer workout for the chest, triceps, hips, and core. 
How about a spring recipe that is fresh & new? 
My favorite spring recipe right now is to mix shrimp, mayo, lime, and arugula on a bun. Perfect for a picnic in the park. Pair it with some sparkling rose and you have the perfect date.
Any new ideas or workshops or plans for summer?
I would love to do a Candlelight Rooftop Yoga when it warms up, as well as implementing a Level Two Yoga Class for the more advanced students to have a place to challenge themselves. A Power Glow Yoga events with black-lights would be so much fun!
Thanks to Kris Walters for the interview questions. You can find Katelyn’s schedule here.