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New Trainer! -Neal Haley-

Hi there! My name is Neal Haley. You’ve probably seen me at the front desk or working out on the gym floor. I have been a member of Fremont Health Club since 2014, but only just joined the team at the beginning of this year.

I am currently studying to get my ACE personal trainer certification and am looking forward to working with clients one on one. Starting at the beginning of April, I’ll also be teaching some group fitness classes like HIIT, Circuit, Butts & Guts, and TB 50/50.

My fitness journey began late compared to other athletes. I grew up in a home full of artist. My Pa is a conductor and music director, my mom is an author, my sister is an illustrator, and my brother is a musician. My family was never very outdoorsy or active and as a kid, I had more energy than my parents knew what to do with. I used to jump rope in front of their tv during commercial breaks and run up and down the stairs in my house for hours on end. From an early age, I had a difficult time sleeping. My energy seemed limitless.

During Jr. High and High School, I went to a performing and fine arts academy where I focused primarily on visual arts. There were no sports at my school, so it wasn’t until after high school that I truly discovered my love for movement. Initially, I only started working out so I could exhaust myself enough to sleep at night. My struggle with insomnia got really rough in my early 20’s and sleep medication didn’t seem to work for me.

So, I worked out. A lot! I took every class I could find. I got a personal trainer and learned how to properly lift weights. And you know what? It helped! But beyond just helping me sleep at night, I realized it brought me a deep sense of joy and satisfaction that I had never felt before. I thrived by challenging myself, breaking and redefining my limits, and competing against the me I was the day before. I met Coach Manny at the club and he introduced me to boxing and it was love at first punch. I loved the discipline, the history of the sport, the warrior spirit it raised in me, the amount of mental energy it required.

Fast forward a few years and here I am making fitness my career. I decided to pursue something that makes me happy, helps me sleep, pushes my limits, brings me joy, and gives me purpose. If you take a class or train with me, I hope it is apparent just hope much I LOVE to move. I hope to share that joy with everyone I work with.

Introducing Rachel Mckay!

Hi Fremont Health Club!

 

Have you noticed that office just to the left of the front desk when you come in? I will be hanging out there on Monday, April 8th and would love to meet you. My name is Rachel and I’ll be joining your community to provide mental health support in the form of coaching or counseling. Outside of FHC, I enjoy playing in nature, cooking with family and friends, and finding adventure. Keep reading to learn more about the services I’ll be providing or stop by and please come say hi!

 

Counseling

Feeling stuck? Does your mind race when you just want to relax? Are you adjusting to a significant change? Life brings trials and we are not always able to respond in the way that we would like. Perhaps you are experiencing relationship issues, challenging family dynamics, anxiety, depression, addiction, or some other trial that has left you feeling hopeless. Often in these moments, we long to be heard and understood. If you’re facing a difficult season, you don’t need to struggle alone. As your counselor, my goal is to meet you where you are at, help you gain perspective, and encourage you toward ongoing growth. I am here to work with you and for you as you gain peace and strength.

 

Coaching

Do you struggle with work-life balance? Do you find it difficult to prioritize your health? Do you want to start making healthy changes to your lifestyle but not sure where to start? Coaching services are for you. After designing a customized wellness plan we will meet regularly in order to achieve your goals.

 

General Support

Need a little extra encouragement to meet your goals? With general support services, receive a 15min consultation, weekly text/email encouragement, and customized suggestions for motivation.

 

 

Interested in Scheduling a Free initial consult? Reach out today.

 

Rachel McKay, M.A., LMFTA

406-861-6460

rachel@eaglecrestwellness.com

eaglecrestwellness.com

Member Spotlight: Matt Jones

Matt Jones is a regular face at the gym.  He always comes in with a big smile and friendly greeting. We got to talking to him the other day to reveal where this inner contentment comes from. -He enjoys what he does. Read on to hear his story.

Outside of the gym, Matt is an abstract painter. He paints very large pieces and works with designers specializing in providing furnishings and art for high-end residential projects. 

Matt had only been painting for 3 months and just sold his first painting in 2004 when he started Gasworks Gallery. He converted a 3 story, 12,000 sq ft warehouse by Lake Union in Wallingford

into his art studio, that is still going strong today. The building is a beautiful earthy blue on the outside and turn-of-the-century ultra funky on the inside with a lot of natural light. Over time it evolved into an artist enclave with 60 studios and one really fabulous fully equipped photography studio that he now shares with over a dozen photographers.

Outside of the art world, Matt founded a grassroots community project called MashedPotatoes.org. Every year Mashed Potatoes delivers 2 semi-truck loads of potatoes to King 5 Team Harvest (Washington’s local hunger relief agency). Last December was their 14th year.

Matt says his life as a painter is a total blast! He’s always thought it was more like play than work and his time in the gym is similar. He does his signature Matt Jones 30-minute workout. The secret to his ease of dedication is that his houseboat is about 2 blocks from the gym and it’s easy for him to just walk over, hit about a dozen machines, back-to-back, in 30 minutes and go back home. Matt says he loves Fremont Health Club because there are a lot of friendly people and the sun shines all day in the space.

If you would like to learn more about Matt and his work check out the links below!

Matt’s bio:  http://mattjonesdesign.com/jones/About_Matt.html

The Mashed Potatoes Project: http://mashedpotatoes.org/

Matt’s    Paint Dancing project:  http://paintdancing.com

Member Spotlight: Rita

I see you regularly working hard in the gym and training with Manny, one of our trainers.  What are your fitness goals and what motivates you to work so hard?

I play flat track roller derby, a full-contact sport which requires both explosive strength and endurance, so my primary goals are: 1) to be able to move laterally and forward very quickly, sometimes from a complete standstill; 2) not to tire easily but, when I do start to lose energy, to fight through it and keep going; 3) to be able to recover quickly when I fall or get knocked down; 4) to be able to move blockers from the opposing team, (who are all considerably bigger than I am) out of my way if I can’t get around them. Besides the inspiration and encouragement Manny gives me, I am motivated to work harder than I ever thought I could because I do not have an athletic background: I never have played a sport in my life, while many of the other skaters have. I also am not very fast, nor do I have great form, so I feel like I need to do something that will at least enable me to be a competitive player, if not a better skater.

How has using a personal trainer impacted your routine?

Well, I never really had a routine before I started working with Manny. Now, not only do I have a weekly session with him, which I affectionately call “Thursday Hurts Day,” but he’s also given me a specific workout to do every day on my own. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) combines cardio with strength exercises; it’s extremely challenging and exhausting, but it’s the best routine to achieve the goals I mention above. I also am really lucky to be able to work with someone who is both a boxer and familiar with derby, because he teaches me how to move my feet quickly, do a feint/juke to confuse the opposing players about my intended direction, and never to stop trying even when I feel like I’m not going to succeed.

Tell us a little about your roller derby league.

The Puget Sound Outcast Derby league is a gender-inclusive, community-based, skater-run group of players of all ages–with a span of more than two decades between the youngest and oldest–and skill levels, from new skaters to seasoned ones. One of my favorite things about the league is that I’m not the only member who is dorky/nerdy and doing something completely out of my comfort zone. It took me a while to find a league where I felt I could fit in; as soon as I started skating with PSOD I felt like I finally found a derby home. We are a very supportive and fun group, and we need more skaters! If you think you may be interested, please feel free to talk to me in person or email pugetsoundoutcastderby@gmail.com

You are smaller than your average player.  How does that affect your abilities as a team member?

As I mentioned, I feel like I have to work really hard to be able to hold my own against a lot of the other players since they are bigger than I am. On the other hand, as a short woman from NYC, I’m naturally aggressive and conditioned to be in perpetual motion, so I don’t like it when people get in my space and slow me down. When I think about how I used to move my body to get around someone or make my way through a crowd–without being seen, since I’m about a foot below the average person’s eyesight–it reminds me that if I get lower so that I literally am blocked from view by the backs of the players who are blocking me (ha ha), then I have a better chance of sneaking around them.

What are some of the other things you do and interests you have?

I have been a devoted Pearl Jam fan for almost 30 years now, ever since I listened to their first album in the 90’s. They are the reason I moved to Seattle and why I skate under the name Deadly Vedder. Needless to say, whenever I have a chance to do anything band-related, it takes precedence over just about everything else! But the most important thing in my life that defines who I am as a person is improving the health and welfare of both wild and companion animals. Currently I am a volunteer research assistant on an American crow behavior study; I also volunteer at the Seattle Animal Shelter as a canine massage therapist.

What made you choose FHC as your fitness facility?

Multiple things: it’s a small business rather than a corporate franchise; the space is perfect–lots of natural light, water views, and no loud music; it’s never crowded; the location is ideal; it’s unusually affordable; and, of course, the owner and staff are always friendly and helpful.

Interview with Helen Lafferty

We all come from somewhere and our different stories make up this community that we have created at FHC. Here is an interview with one of our members, Helen Lafferty.

1. You are originally from Ireland. What brought you to the US and how long have you been a resident here?
I came from Ireland with my husband in 1986. We are both physicians, and we came to Boston to do some post-graduate training. We thought we were going to stay for three years but somehow ended up staying quite a bit longer than that! Now I have lived in the US for more than half of my life! The years have flown by.

2. Did you become a citizen?
Yes! I became a citizen, because I wanted to be able to vote. And I do vote!

3. What was the process like?
At that time were living in New Mexico, so we had to travel long distances to get through certain parts of the process. Apart from that, it was easy!

4. Do you have dual citizenship?
Yes. I would not have become a US citizen if that had meant giving up my Irish citizenship. Being Irish is still a huge part of my life and my identity. But I am happy to be a citizen of the country I actually live in.

5. What has caused you to take multiple trips back there lately?
Well, my Dad died in January this year. It was very, very difficult for me to be so far away when that happened. I made three trips to Ireland this year because of that – for his funeral, getting his house ready to sell etc. Then, after that, my husband’s sister died at age 58, so we made another trip to Ireland for her funeral. In October I made one more trip for a family wedding (my fifth of the year!), and it felt good to finally go back to Ireland for a happy event!

6. Have you felt it difficult to be a part of two worlds, and what are the things that make you feel most connected to your home in Seattle?
For me it has been very hard to be part of two worlds and to have two places I call “home.” I love living in the US, but it has also been hard for me to be so far away from Ireland, especially from my parents as they grew older and I was not there to be able to help them. I imagine many, many immigrants to the US feel that same yearning and pull to the country of their birth. I don’t think it ever really goes away. My husband and three adult children are here in the US, so this is home for me now! But I will always love Ireland dearly, and I hope to continue going back there regularly to enjoy my beautiful country of origin.
I think Seattle is a wonderful city to live in. It is just the right size for me – not too big (or too small!). It has the best climate in the US for an Irish person – not too hot or too cold! It has all the art galleries and music venues and bookshops that I love to have close by, and it is easy to get around – I walk as much as I can around the city. Best of all, it has beautiful nature that is very close by. I have lived in quite a few places in the US, but Seattle is where I will stay!

7. You stay in great shape. How has FHC been a part of this journey?
I LOVE Fremont Health Club! The teachers are wonderful, the staff are all very friendly and helpful, and the schedule of classes is great. I do not use the machines, but I go to a lot of classes. I have met many wonderful people at FHC and made some great new friends through the gym as well.
My Dad was almost 92 when he died in January, and he had been going to the gym three times every week until a couple of months before he died. He inspires me every single day to try and stay as fit as I can for as long as I can. FHC is helping me along that journey, and I am really happy to be a member of this gym.

8. Anything else you would like our members to know about you?
I ride my bicycle with my husband – that is our entertainment! Last year, we cycled across the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park in Montana. That was HARD! But we love to be outside as much as we can, enjoying this beautiful earth we live on.
My other form of entertainment is singing. I sing with a great choir in Seattle – Seattle Pro Musica.

Thank you Helen for sharing your story and for showing us what a privilege it is to vote!

Tips for Aging in Place

What Every Senior Should Know About Safely Aging In Place

Kent Elliott

Nearly 90 percent of seniors in the U.S. want to age in place (stay in their homes), even if they may eventually need daily assistance or in-home health care. While it’s understandable why one would want to maintain their independence in their own surroundings, their home may not be adapted to mobility and health issues, so it’s important that modifications are made to ensure one’s safety and comfort. Of course, the best time to make such changes is before they are actually needed to prevent injury from occurring — some people start as early as their fifties or sixties.

While you can conduct your own home assessment in order to determine your needs, it’s best to hire an occupational therapist (sometimes paid for by Medicare) to do the job for you, as they’re trained to make such judgments, even prematurely. These pros also have extensive knowledge of assistive technologies, which is helpful because there is an abundance of new options and advancements on the market on a regular basis.

Once you figure out which modifications you need, decide which ones you can do yourself, which require the help of a pro, and how you’re going to pay for everything. Here’s a guide to help you navigate this process so that you can stay safe while saving as much money as possible.

DIY

There are many simple tweaks you can do on your own that take little time or effort, starting with removing all tripping hazards, such as area rugs and excessive clutter. Other considerations include:

  • Swapping out grungy carpets for a low-density, shorter pile variety and installing slip-resistant flooring in the bathroom and kitchen.
  • For those struggling with visibility (including those with dementia), task lighting can make it easier to perform everyday activities, such as brushing teeth, reading, and cooking. Painting the walls in a light but glare-free color while keeping the ceiling white can improve the lighting in a room, too.
  • Replace regular faucets with modified anti-scald valves that rely on water pressure to regulate the flow of hot water.
  • Handrails on both sides of all staircases and grab bars in the bathroom near the toilet and in the shower/tub are essential aids for preventing falls.
  • Assistive technology such as a video doorbell that’s connected to Wi-Fi provides both safety and convenience, while a personal medical alert system offers peace of mind to seniors and loved ones alike.

Hire A Pro

Before hiring a pro, make sure you obtain references — particularly from clients who also needed similar home modifications. While it is possible to build a wheelchair ramp yourself, it’s a complex and time-consuming project, so you’re better off leaving it in the hands of an expert, especially since safety is a concern. Other big-ticket projects that require assistance are installing a chair stair lift or elevator, replacing a tub with a walk-in shower, and lowering countertops and cabinets for easier use.

Funding The Modifications

Not all modifications come cheaply, but there are grants available to those in need. Though not available everywhere in the U.S., there are some state assistance programs to help fund age-related construction and home enhancements.

If home modifications aren’t enough to make a completely safe environment, consider searching for an accessible property in your area. Make a checklist to find what you’re looking for, and use an online filter to help you narrow down your options. Note that homes in Seattle, Washington, typically sell for $737,000.

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Learn more about Kent

My Book

Trainer Spotlight: Tim Beauchamp

Trainer Spotlight: Tim Beauchamp

You teach a regular morning class, “Strength Training 101”, at FHC. It is geared for members that are 50+ years of age. Why is this target group such a passion for you?

It’s funny, it did not start out being a primary interest, but I was offered the chance to take over a class that Swedish Hospital had been running for post-cardiac rehab patients at my old gym, Sound Mind and Body. After watching what they were doing, I went and talked to the members of the class and said that I would take over the class, but would change things up because I did not think that they were doing enough. The class became “Silver Power” (the students picked the name, not me). That was almost 15 years ago. As I have trained more and more, I realize that there is a huge need for older people to do more for their basic health. Aging is so popular, that everybody is doing it, but not that many are doing it as well as they could. I have worked hard to stay fit as I get older and have learned a lot that I think is useful for others. I have also learned a lot from the older clients that I have trained, have seen the difference that physical training can have on people’s lives first hand.

What is your background? What drew you to training and teaching?

I have been an athlete all of my life, starting to play tennis when I was six and becoming a serious cyclist and swimmer in high school. I played tennis in college and was first exposed to judo there as well. Once I moved to Germany as a new lieutenant in the Army, I joined the local judo team and worked my way onto the highest level competitions in Germany. After some serious surgery on both of my legs, I got back into cycling and swimming to rehabilitate myself. Because I was already in the Army and had been a runner, I soon decided to try running a triathlon. I competed internationally for several years in Europe and continued to train to this day. Back in the States, I was in a military reserve unit as a major and was approached by the brigade commander to help set up a remedial Physical Training program for the unit. After being struck by a car while on a training ride, I again rehabilitated myself. Friends suggested that I knew so much about training and rehab that I should make a career of it.

I also hear that you are a do-it-yourself carpenter, a musician, and a writer. Did I miss anything?

I am getting back into my photography and scuba diving, and hoping to get my planted aquariums back up and running!

Member Spotlight: Peter Brickman

If you haven’t met Peter Brickman during your workout, he is one of our long-time members and comes in almost daily for his workout. He’s newly retired but is as active as ever. One of the friendliest guys you will meet, Peter loves bicycling, dogs and tennis, and staying active.

Peter, you are a very active senior. What keeps you going so strong?
Some years ago, when I thought I was old, I referred to the joke: “If I knew I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself.” Now that I really am old, it’s not that funny. I’m an insulin dependent diabetic, so diet, exercise, and reduced stress are things that I am constantly aware of; of course, this is important for everyone! Exercise has always been part of my life- it’s become a good addiction!

Besides coming to the gym almost every day, what other activities do you do?
I ride my bike everywhere! My tennis game has suffered, due to some physical restrictions. But, I’m still enthusiastic and every once in a while I hit a good shot that brings me back. Now that I’m recently retired, I’m catching up on my books and DVD’s and plan on taking continuing education classes. I have worked as a professional chef and I have more time to test my cooking skills and surprise myself.

How has the Fremont Health Club made a difference in your life?
The family atmosphere is comforting and inviting. The new sauna will seal the deal forever.

My dog, Harley, jumps up as soon you enter the building because he knows you so well. Are you a dog whisperer?
I try to say “Woof!” to every dog I meet, to let them know I’m a member of the pack. Harley is my BFF.

Any advice you want to pass along to others?
Good health is everything.

 

Instructor Spotlight: Katelyn Page

We are thrilled to have Katelyn Page back with us,  teaching Barre and Yoga. We asked her a few questions about her motivations as a teacher, her teaching style, and the importance of community.

FHC: You teach different types of classes, such as Barre and Yoga. What are the benefits of practicing a variation of classes?

KP: I love Yoga and I love Barre and they each give different challenges physically and mentally, and I think that’s important.  A well-rounded approach works best in the fitness world. Each class has a different intention. With Barre, there’s a big emphasis on muscle endurance. With yoga, there’s more emphasis on stretching and growing flexibility. It’s important to find different ways to gain muscle strength, cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, muscular endurance, and of course intentional nutrition. When the goal is optimal results, it’s important to find the well rounded cross-training experience.

FHC: How did you start teaching yoga?
KP: I fell in love with yoga when I was young. My mom has scoliosis and so we would do some yoga together in our living room. I was drawn to how powerful I felt breathing with intention, and to how strong I felt holding postures. Armed with this appreciation, my relationship with yoga grew the more I practiced. Once I decided to take the leap and take teacher training, I haven’t really looked back since.

FHC: What inspires you most about teaching?

KP: My students. Seeing their progress each week inspires me to be better. There’s such an incredible feeling when a student gets crow pose after weeks of practicing. Or seeing a student nail a V-Sit Ball Exchange. Experiencing that communion together feels spiritual. A lot of my students have become my closet friends, and it’s just because we both show up each week. I am genuinely honored to be teaching and it’s been so humbling to meet so many amazing individuals.

FHC: Why do you emphasize community in your classes?

KP: I have never tried to incorporate community, inclusion has always come naturally for me. Many students come to the same classes each week, and we see the same faces each time. We experience a class together, and if you’ve taken my classes then you know it’s a challenge, and we are all struggling together. To me, it feels natural to show encouragement to each other, or interact and acknowledge that we are all experiencing something together. At the beginning of each Barre class, I have my students introduce themselves to their neighbors and instantly the mood in the classroom shifts from a very intense and solemn vibe to a more playful, friendly, and inclusive experience. It’s hard to make friends as an adult, and I understand that for many, life is really freaking hard, and sometimes lonely. Taking the time to create a sense of community, to know that we’re not alone, it’s important.

FHC: For those that haven’t taken your classes yet, what do you want them to know?

KP: In my classes, you can expect a playful and challenging class, where you can come as you are. I try to let loose, have fun, and will probably dance during class. Oh, and I play fun music that you’ll want to dance to too. Life is way too short not to celebrate! I want my students, new and old, to know that I think they are important, that they matter a great deal, and that showing up is enough. My only expectation for you is to be kind. To those around you, but also to yourself.

Instructor Spotlight: Meet Janell Hartman

Janell Hartman, true to her name, has a big heart. She has been teaching Vinyasa Yoga at FHC since we first started six years ago.  In the early years, she volunteered with us, while we got established.  Her knowledge, experience, and love for the art of yoga have been a life-changing for many. Besides her involvement with the FHC, she is spreading her love and knowledge of yoga to critical programs like Yoga Behind Bars and offers Teacher Trainings in the Seattle area. Basically, Janelle is a rock star and we wanted to share a few things about her with you all.

What drew you to volunteer to teach with Yoga Behind Bars?

Early 2013 I happened to answer a call for help one evening at a friend’s restaurant when one of their servers was sick. They were hosting a fundraiser for Yoga Behind Bars and one of the guest speakers was a former inmate who had been released from prison a couple of years prior. She shared how the yoga classes and teachers had impacted her life inside and helped her integrate when she got out. I was moved to tears. That was it for me. I got involved right away.

What inspires you the most about teaching in prison?

There are very few folks who ever get to know themselves as well as those who’ve been to very dark places, have been ostracized, and experienced profoundly deep conflict. When that degree of darkness is navigated and transformed, the light of that redemption can guide a suffering world into balance. I witness the power of ethics and soul development at the core of the ancient Yogic teachings changing these guys in a big way. They’re forging true freedom independent of their circumstances. They’re turning around and sharing it. That inspires me.

What else are you up to?

I conduct teacher trainings for Yin and for Restorative yoga a few times per year here in Seattle and out at Breitenbush Hotsprings. My main work is at the Tummy Temple, a wonderful naturopathic healing center where I am a colon hydrotherapist and electro-lymphatic therapist. I’m also their director of outreach and education. I teach a free community class on a different practical natural health topic every first Thursday of the month at Tummy Temple. Hop on our website and check out our services and happenings!

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